68 point, 3 ½ stars

Blurb:

More witches are falling, and evil is gaining more of a foothold is Sylvalan. The Bard, the Muse, and the Gatherer of Souls are some of the only fae with the desire to stop it. Add in a ragtag group of humans and witches, spread across the land, and things are starting to look hopeless. 

Quote:

“Falco, if you do decide to make the acquaintance of the witches in this Old Place, don’t let Breanna talk you into taking the dog.”

Review:

Shadows and Light was one really long transition book. It suffers from middle child syndrome quite heavily. Nothing really happens. We just got more of what happened in book one, just with more despair. Nothing was really solved. More was just heaped into the shitpile to be solved in the last book.

This was also just depressing as hell. It was so dire. It had so little hope. Like The Pillars of the World, I just had trouble really wanting to continue reading this. This time because there just was no hope. I couldn’t see how this was going to end with a good ending, simply because there doesn’t appear to be a good ending to be had. There were moments were it was funny. For instance, my favourite character of the entire book was a dog who doesn’t listen. He surprised a really big laugh out of me, and I thought I was going to wake up my dad with it. However, it was also just kind of boring for most of the time.

Honestly, just not a lot happened. I can’t point to many things that happened in this book. Adrian and Lyrra are wandering around, trying to find someone who will listen to what they say. Morag is struggling to come to terms what she has learned and looking for a place that will hear what she has to say and help. Liam is being introduced into the world he lives in, and his sister Breanna is starting to become a place where others will turn. And Ashk is seemingly the one with all the answers, but no one has made it to her for those answers yet. It was kind of boring.

The best part of Shadows of Light was probably the fact that the bad guys are basically not in this book. There are a few chapters from their perspective, but nothing like the last book. This is good because in general, I don’t really like reading Bishop’s villain’s perspectives. But also because I really just didn’t feel like reading torture scenes again.

Overall, Shadows and Light is just setup for the final book in the trilogy. I just struggled trying to continue reading this, and that was even after taking a break after reading the first book before jumping into this one. I want to love this, but I can’t help but hate it a little bit, even as I enjoyed it. I feel like a walking contradiction when it comes to this book. It was well done, though, and that is sometimes all I really ask of something.

To read more reviews for this series, check out the Tir Alainn series page!